So can you start a farm at 60?

I have spent my entire adult working life in IT and the telecommunications field. It has never been a vocation that I have enjoyed but was provided by God to allow me to raise my family and keep the lights on. It now appears that career is coming to a close and it is time for a second act.

God has wired me to see and appreciate him in nature. Walking alone in a field or in a wooded park has always made me feel in close communion with him. I can see his hand in watching a seed grow into a plant, observing wildlife in their natural state or seeing the interconnectedness of all living things keeps me in awe of the universe that he has created.

I have enjoyed growing plants since I was a child. Some of my earliest memories include an elderly neighbor (elderly ha, she was probably in her late 60’s) that taught me to grow things in her garden. She created her own compost and grew plants and vegetables without the use of chemicals. This was back in the 1960’s before organic gardening or permaculture were common practices. She lived across the street on a 1/2 acre filled with perennial plants, berries, grapevines and all manner of vegetables. Her yard and gardens were what a permaculturist would classify as a food forest. You could walk through the garden and pluck a ripe berry or grape and put it directly in your mouth to savor the freshness because you didn’t have to worry about ingesting an insecticide or herbicide (I can almost taste those blackberries and strawberries).

I have grown plants as a hobby for a long time and began raising chickens and bees several years ago. I subscribe to an almost complete organic method of gardening…with one exception I live in Texas….Fire ants…If you aren’t familiar with those vile little insects…They don’t fight fair…they work in concert together and never bite alone…Each sting feels like a pinch or a burning sensation, followed by itching and then by a pimple like blister that can last for weeks…and they are fast…feel the sting, look down and you are covered by them… yes, they must die…. So, I do use fire ant killer on their mounds… other than that all natural…

We have purchased a farm on 20 acres of rolling hills that is partially wooded. The farm hasn’t been worked in about 40 years and came complete with falling down outbuildings and lots of trash. The farm has been overgrazed and the soil has eroded in places and just generally abused. If I close my eyes I can see a beautiful piece of property with happy animals and healthy produce. It will require a lot of back breaking work, sweat and I’m sure more than a few tears.

So back to the point. Am I starting out on this adventure too late in life? I turn 60 in a few months…Can one start a farm later in life? I guess we shall see…